Tuesday 30th Nov, 2021

ASBSH Member Profile: Peter Copley

In each issue, ABHR profiles a member of the Australian Society for Bulk Solids Handling (ASBSH). We speak to Peter Copley, Engineering Manager at Conveyor Products & Solutions.

In each issue, ABHR profiles a member of the Australian Society for Bulk Solids Handling (ASBSH). We speak to Peter Copley, Engineering Manager at Conveyor Products & Solutions.

I have been a member of ASBSH since…

2015

I am a member of ASBSH because…

it is a great way to stay up to date with what is happening in the bulk solids industry, as well as network with other materials handling professionals. I first joined because I had been working in other industries for a short time and wanted to refresh my knowledge of the industry quickly, and have stayed a member ever since.

I got into bulk handling because…

I spent three months on site at a minerals sand mine for my work experience, and I was hooked. That site had both conveyors and pumping systems for transport, and one of the plants was on a barge – it opened my eyes to the variety of problems that are faced in bulk handling, and that every day in the industry would be different. 

I am currently researching…

materials – that’s a very general response I know but because of the variety of materials I use or specify in my current role I try to keep abreast of new developments that may have benefits in our industry.

I love my current work because…

I’m always learning and solving problems – we often get boxed in by a variety of restraints from customers and its very satisfying to find that one piece of geometry, metallurgy or materials science that lets you achieve a solution that fits everyone’s needs. I also get asked for a wide range of advice – everything from simple idler fixes up to solving dynamic power problems on long, complex conveyor systems.

In my role it’s important to…

listen – to my staff, customers and suppliers, be humble whilst doing so and be constructive with my responses. Sometimes the best innovations can come from someone approaching a problem in a totally different way, so I try not to lead discussions too much with previous work.

The project I am most proud of is…

when I was on the design team for a Pilbara Iron Ore mine, and worked on it from pre-feasibility through to commissioning, designing conveyor systems, chutes, and bins, as well as selecting components and managing their fabrication. Even now in a different role and with a different company I occasionally still get a chance to visit that site and see how things are functioning. It’s certainly very satisfying being able to see your ideas on paper come to fruition.

My career highlight is…

achieving my Chartered Status and registrations on a professional level as a recognition of my efforts in the field, and on a personal front, it would have to be the travel working in this field has afforded me.

I am inspired by…

manufacturing and am a huge fan of How it’s Made – learning about how all the things around us get made is exciting for me and means I can help (or annoy) our manufacturing team with great ideas.

The most valuable lesson I have learned is…

don’t always trust what your computer models are showing you – if at all possible have a look. It’s common for engineers to rely on our spreadsheets and software, but often times viewing the area on site, or talking with the right person will get you a special insight.

My plans for the future are…

to continue learning and developing – I only took on my Engineering Manager role about 18 months ago, and while I feel I have a lot to bring to the role, I also know I have a lot to learn and a lot of skills I can improve on.

When I am not working you will probably find me…

Spending time with my family – our little ones don’t leave room for much else currently.

To join the ASBSH, visit bit.ly/3aibXNf