Tuesday 12th Nov, 2019

Boral opens new Melbourne concrete batching plant

Construction materials company Boral has opened a new concrete plant in West Melbourne, replacing the former North Melbourne plant that was closed to make way for the new Melbourne Metro rail project.

Construction materials company Boral has opened a new concrete plant in West Melbourne, replacing the former North Melbourne plant that was closed to make way for the new Melbourne Metro rail project.

The company chose the site to engage the growing local construction market nearby Melbourne’s arterial road and rail network.

This allows Boral to remain close to infrastructure projects in the city’s CBD and the wider metropolitan area, such as the West Gate Tunnel project.

The wet batch plant can supply three concrete agitator trucks every three minutes and at full capacity, it can host 35 trucks on-site at any given time. It also aims to supply up to 2000 cubic metres per day and store 100 tonnes of cementitious materials along with 4000 tonnes of sand and aggregates across 16 bins.

“West Melbourne represents a vital first step in renewing our broader Melbourne concrete network,” said Boral’s Executive General Manager – Southern Region, Lloyd Wallace.

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“We intend to work through reinvestment in key sites across the city over the next few years. In the meantime, West Melbourne has substantially improved our production capabilities close to the Melbourne CBD itself and positions us well to service major infrastructure projects in the area.”

The site is spread across 1.5 hectares and has been designed to allow for single directional traffic flow for heavy vehicles, as well as separating light and heavy vehicles.

Shipping containers have been reused to create the batching office, lunchroom and amenities building, constructed in collaboration with charity TRY Australia.

Underground tanks have been installed to store greywater, which is then recycled for the concrete manufacturing process. Dust extractors have also been installed, along with noise silencers on the cement silo.

Native vegetation has been planted to ensure any possible run-off from the plant does not enter the neighbouring Dynon Road Tidal Canal and Wildlife Reserve. Additional precautions were introduced to protect the nearby Maribyrnong River from excess water.