Wednesday 20th Nov, 2019

Levy lowered for local QLD brewers

New classifications have been introduced to Queensland’s Emergency Management Levy to ensure craft brewers and distillers pay a lower rate than larger companies.

New classifications have been introduced to Queensland’s Emergency Management Levy to ensure craft brewers and distillers pay a lower rate than larger companies.

The Emergency Management Levy is paid by all property owners in Queensland to help fund fire and emergency services.

It was originally introduced in 1984, when there was only four large commercial breweries and distilleries.

Because of Queensland’s craft brewers and distillers reaching new levels of popularity and success, the State Government introduced amendments to recognise the differences within craft brewing and distilling.

Queensland Manufacturing Minister, Cameron Dick, said the changes meant the levy would be assessed on the floor size of breweries and distilleries rather than at a flat rate.

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“A new commercial premises category has been created for craft brewing and distilling operations with a gross floor size of up to 15,000 square metres,” Dick said.

“The changes formally recognise that smaller, niche beer, cider and spirit makers shouldn’t be charged the same rate as much larger operators and will ensure brewers and distiller will pay a levy based on the size of their building, rather than a flat fee.”

The changes to the law will take place over two steps, with the first to see a repeal of the section of the levy introduced in 2019. The second step will come into effect 1 July 2020 and will see the levy applied based on the size of the brewers’ premises.

Emergency Services Minister, Craig Crawford, said the emergency management levy was administered by local councils and the changes to the levy classifications had been discussed with the Local Government Association of Queensland (LGAQ).

“We will be working with the LGAQ to communicate the levy changes to councils and ensure all necessary adjustments to rate notices are made recognising the new building size classifications for brewers and distillers,” Mr Crawford said.

“The amendment will support the ongoing growth of Queensland’s craft brewing and distilling operations across the state.